For Parents

Hey, mama. We get it.

Dear working parent,

We know that you’re pumping in bathrooms, storage closets, borrowed offices, and empty conference rooms.
 
We know about that day you left your breast pump at home. Thank goodness for Emily and her big blue scarf. Wouldn’t it be easier if you had a pump you could leave at work? Wouldn’t it be better if traveling for your job didn’t mean carrying your breast milk in a cooler all the way from San Francisco to Boston, relying on the kindness of airport bartenders to replenish you with fresh ice to keep the goods cold?
 
You love your baby—and want to be the best employee you can be. But managing this balance without the right support can suck you dry.
 
We get it. And we care. That’s why we created a solution that helps employers take the stress out of coming back to work after baby—by offering full-circle support for parents. We’re talking about the best breast pumps, dignified lactation spaces, 24/7 virtual support, and milk shipping. But we need you to help us spread the word; you can use the letter below to make it easy.
 
With your help, we can make returning to work as a new parent easier. Let’s change the culture of breastfeeding and pumping at work. Together.

Love,
Medela and Mamava


Be your own advocate.

Step 1: Know your rights

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires break time and a private lactation space for non-exempt breastfeeding employees. Many states and cities have additional lactation accommodation laws.

​Step 2: Know your benefits

Check your employee policies to understand what, if any, support your workplace offers new moms and breastfeeding parents. You may be well supported. If not, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3: Ask for what you need

Requesting lactation accommodations can feel uncomfortable—here is a template you might use:

Mom embracing baby.

Step 1: Know your rights

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires break time and a private lactation space for non-exempt breastfeeding employees. Many states and cities have additional lactation accommodation laws.

​Step 2: Know your benefits

Check your employee policies to understand what, if any, support your workplace offers new moms and breastfeeding parents. You may be well supported. If not, proceed to Step 3.

Step 3: Ask for what you need

Requesting lactation accommodations can feel uncomfortable—here is a template you might use:

Check out our letter template

Download our sample copy